Tag Archives | growth

mindset in wood type

Do you trust in your ability to grow?

Carol Dweck, a widely-regarded Stanford professor of psychology, and I recently sat down to discuss her 20-years of research and insights on what drives growth. Your book, Mindset, is about the growth (vs. fixed) mindset; what have you learned about growth? Knowledge and understanding are socially constructed. This is to say, you are not ever  More

3 Things That Change You

3 Ways To Fuel Your Own Growth

There are 3 things that change you: travel, the people you meet, and the books you read. A few weeks back, at the Foster School of Business Innovation conference, I heard Doug Plank, a VC, say that.  To take in new ideas is to let yourself be changed. And, there’s probably as many techniques as  More

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Our Obsession with Scale is Failing Us

Bank of America just announced they will cut 16,000 jobs by year-end, an acceleration of a previously announced “efficiency effort.” After this, they’ll no longer be the largest banking employer. Now, it’s easy to think that Bank of America is failing, that it’s yet another bad situation related to a down economy. But there’s something  More

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The Critic Must Die

When product lines fail, product managers feel responsible. When children steal, parents often feel like they haven’t taught ethics and self-control well. When a business team doesn’t want to work together, isn’t the leader to blame? The line from GI Jane: “Remember, there are no bad teams, only bad leaders” reinforces this point. And as  More

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Difficulty is a Great Teacher

What I thought was torture when I worked at Apple – working with 23 different managers in seven years – I now see as an experience that refined by ability to work with many different kinds of leaders. It was a training ground that has paid big dividends – though I couldn’t see it that  More

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The WSJ Interview By-Product

it’s okay to be stretched. At this point, you’re on the edge. And, the edge is where you are forced to be creative. It’s where your decisions are sharper and more informed. You make calls because you have to, not because they are convenient. “We can’t do this right now because that is more important.” Being at the limit forces you to think about value and we think that’s a great place to be.

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