Enthusiasm for #SocialEra

FastCompany.com will feature an excerpt from the #SocialEra book on Monday.

But Forbes Women beat ‘em to the punch in a piece on Thursday saying, “This is one of best books describing the deep shifts in how we operate in the world that I’ve read in years–probably the most radical and compelling since Clay Shirky’s Here Comes Everybody.”

Forbes.com said, “Ms. Merchant’s new work provides a provocative vision of the future of both what organizations and what work might look like, yet grounded in real businesses today. … this will inspire ideas and thought about what running a business really means.”

 

This week, someone at Bloomberg asked me to have my publicist contact a particular department. I was a little embarrassed to reveal that I have no apparatus, and that I have no publicist. This book is about how individuals – connected with a shared purpose – can organize and create value in ways that once only centralized organizations (and people with positional power) could. So it was out of alignment to have a publicist when the book’s thesis is that value is created when anyone who wants to join in, just joins in.

And they have. I thought you might like to see the early enthusiasm for #SocialEra. In addition to Deanna Zandt and Rawn Shah (linked above):

Business 2 Community featured a piece on the book.

Social marketing expert (and dear friend), Tara Hunt posted a Q&A with me, including why I wrote the book.

Pipeline Fellowship asked me to advise entrepreneurs and those who fund them n the #SocialEra. Bottom line: Figure out how to be open.

Post drawing out implications for #SocialEra as it relates to Education in this post.

Chuck Eesley, Stanford professor and innovation expert, wrote an early and enthusiastic review:

Andrew Armour seemed to especially like the obituary in his review, here.

Sustainability expert, Chris Oestereich says “Nilofer doesn’t have all the answers, but I think she’ll help you begin the transition from today’s road to ruin to tomorrow’s path of sustainable prosperity. “

Innovation expert and professor, Tim Kastelle did several posts: here on the book itself, and here on reframing.

Of course, there are reviews on Amazon, HBR, and Goodreads. (If you have read the book, add your voice to the book reviews; it makes a difference to others.)

Thank you to all the Gazelles sharing your ideas, reviews, blog posts, nearly 1500 twitter endorsements, and so on. This never was or is about a book, but about sharing ideas that matter to the future. I know none of you are looking for acknowledgment or for me to retweet you or promote you. I know that. You are looking to build communities based on shared purpose. It is not about credit. It is about jointly creating momentum. You are doing that, and so much more. Keep on leaping.

 

If you want to know why all these people are sharing, you can download your copy and read away!

Click to buy…

4 Responses:

  1. Beth Kling. September 25, 2012 at 3:06 am  |  

    Is the book available in adobe epub format? I read on a nook.

    Reply
    • Nilofer Merchant. September 25, 2012 at 9:43 am  |  

      Hmmm. That is a great question; All I know is that whatever form factor Amazon and HBR sell in is what it is. But I’m guessing that Nooks can accomodate it.

      Reply

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